Salisbury Cathedral: A beautiful place of prayer and contemplation

Salisbury Cathedral

 

 

Salisbury Cathedral was formally known as the Cathedral Church of the Blessed Virgin Mary and is an Anglican cathedral in Salisbury, Wiltshire. It is a leading example of early English architecture and one of Britain’s most popular tourist attractions. The main body of the cathedral was completed in only 38 years, from 1220 to 1258. It has the tallest spire in Britain (123m/404 ft) and if you’re feeling brave enough, you can take a tour of it. It also has the best surviving of the four original copies of the Magna Carter, all of which are in England. In 2008, the cathedral celebrated the 750th anniversary of its consecration.

It’s towering architecture and ambition is matched only by the calm serenity once you step through its doors ( a very humble route leads you into the main part of the cathedral). If you are visiting Wiltshire, it is a must-see, and Salisbury itself is a very attractive and welcoming town. Personally, I love the architecture, detail and scale of these great edifices, and that’s why I enjoy photographing them.

Enough words from me. I simply hope you enjoy the images. All were taken on a Canon 5D MKIII with 17-40 lens, no flash, and then lightly edited in Photoshop CS5 and Lightroom 5.

Michael

 

 

Salisbury Cathedral

 

 

The three images below show the Cathedral Font. It is very popular and you need to arrive when the gates open if you want to get a shot without anyone around – or, be very patient! Cruciform in shape, it has a 3-metre span to allow total immersion baptism. It is made of bronze and stone and was designed by water sculptor William Pye. It was funded by Salisbury residents Sir Christopher and Lady Benson and The Jerusalem Trust, which promotes Christianity through evangelism, education and art. Installed in September 2008 and dedicated by Archbishop of Canterbury during the celebration of the 750th anniversary of the consecration of the cathedral.

 

Salisbury Cathedral

 

 

Salisbury Cathedral

 

 

 

Salisbury Cathedral

 

 

These next images show some of the early Gothic vaulting of the cathedral

 

Salisbury Cathedral

 

Salisbury Cathedral

 

 

Salisbury Cathedral

 

 

The tomb below is of Richard Mitford (died 1407)  who was an English bishop of Chichester from 17 November 1389, and consecrated on 10 April 1390 and then Bishop of Salisbury.

 

Tomb of Richard Mitford, Salisbury Cathedral

 

 

Salisbury Cathedral

 

 

Salisbury Cathedral

 

 

The next two images show the stunning beauty and detail of the Quire

Salisbury Cathedral

 

 

Salisbury Cathedral

 

The extraordinary figures that you can see in these next two images are ‘The Apostles Speaking in Tongues Lit By Their Own Lamps’ by acclaimed British artist Nicholas Pope; a grouping of terracotta figures, representing a dramatic re-enactment of the events narrated in the New Testament when the Holy Spirit came amongst the Apostles in the ‘form of cloven fire’. They were first shown at Tate Britain, in London, in 1996-97, and now have been installed here in the Trinity Chapel of the cathedral for Pentecost (8 June) and will reside here until 4 August 2014.

 

Salisbury Cathedral

 

 

 

Salisbury Cathedral

 

 

Salisbury Cathedral

 

 

These final images show the Cathedral Cloisters

Salisbury Cathedral

 

 

Salisbury Cathedral

 

 

Salisbury Cathedral

 

ALL IMAGES © MICHAEL DAVID 2014

 

 

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~ by michael's eye on June 22, 2014.

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